CHAKE CONSERVANCY
© Chake Conservancy and licensors 2020
Maasai Mara  For Public and Wildlife Benefit

Welcome

Chake is a community-based conservancy in Narok county, Maasai Mara, founded in 2020 by The Chake Community Development Program (Cert. No. A3452) with the aim of conserving the environment and wildlife, solving human animal conflict and helping the community develop sustainably. It now has its own Chake Conservancy management board.

New Beginnings

Sustainable development is a journey, not a destination and the community have begun with a series of programs aimed to reduce human wildlife conflict and encourage ecological restoration of forest cover because it makes an excellent starting point. Planting trees contributes to sustainable development goals 6 Clean Water And Sanitation, 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities,13 Climate Action and 15 Life On Land.
‘Chake’ means ‘theirs’ in the Kiswahili tongue. This name recognises that ownership of the conservancy is shared with people and wildlife. The community want to live in better harmony with nature and are opposed to the hunting and poaching of wildlife, preferring to benefit from flourishing wildlife through sustainable ecotourism and responsible farming practices. Chake (pronounced Cha-Ke) stands for: C - care for H - human and A - animals K- Kenya E - education Over the years the area had become deforested from unsustainable use as fuel. Since January 2020 members of Chake have raised over 3,500 tree seedlings in their nursery and planted them out to serve simultaneously as habitat and food for wildlife, erosion control, shade trees, windbreaks and for watershed improvement. We seek funding for these operations. Contribute To Chake Conservancy GOFUNDME

What Does Chake Mean?

Our conservancy area is in the eastern part of Masai Mara running from oloololo gate to the end of Masai Mara bordering Serengeti National Park of Tanzania. Our offices are in Oldonyo Orok in Angata barrikoi in Transmara West. More …
Chake Community Development Program helps: advocate against traditional practice of Female Genital Mutilation in Narok area support widows and orphans of wildlife conflict provide healthcare advocacy with prevalent zoonotic issues such as COVID-19, AIDS and Jiggers. educate for health and prosperity More …
Chake in relation to other protected areas.
Chake Conservancy added to map courtesy of africaGeographic.
“A very warm welcome to the new look 2021 Chake Community Conservancy website! I am sure that wherever you live, anywhere in the world, you will agree with me that this last year has been like no other! At Chake we have watched the disaster unfurl with terrible sadness. As I write this, I see the number of Covid deaths in the USA has just topped 300,000. An unbelievable figure! Covid has cursed Kenya too, and many have died but thankfully none of our Chake community have become infected. But we miss our foreign visitors keenly! Before the pandemic nature-based tourism was the lifeblood of many economies and employed 21.8 million jobs worldwide. 1.6 million of them were in Kenya! Tourism revenue also supported many communities living next door to wildlife and conservation. This is especially true in our Conservancies. (See What is a Conservancy). Fortunately, our natural assets and our wonderful wildlife have weathered this storm and as the new year dawns we believe that we can face it with confidence. Covid-19 was not the first zoonotic pandemic to emerge in recent years. Ebola and HIV-AIDS made the jump from primates to humans in damaged tropical forests in Congo. And as a medical man I saw the dreadful impact of HIV-AIDS. It has killed over 33 million, Kenya was especially brutally affected and even now in Chake we are caring for HIV orphans although thanks to our Chake community education efforts and better healthcare the spread is curbed, Covid however has been a true wake up call to the dangers of destroying nature. The world is not fully awake but the voices are ever louder and more difficult for sleepers to ignore! The UN Sec General in his recent speech on World Biodiversity Day stated “Humanity is waging war on nature! ... Nature always strikes back and it is already doing so with growing force and fury.” His words have since been echoed by many other world leaders. And, as scientists state, we are in now as I write this, entering our planet’s Sixth Extinction. More than one million species could become extinct in the coming decades. This is not an asteroid killing dinosaurs. It is humanity waging its war. And not against an enemy. We are waging war on our best ally! Nature! But the UN leader also added “Making peace with Nature is the defining task of the 21st century. It must be the top, top priority for everyone, everywhere.” Making peace with Nature is our philosophy at Chake. We work to stop human/wildlife conflict, we teach poachers other, better ways to make a livelihood rather than Law breaking and killing, we plant trees for our community and our wild neighbours, we think the time for a new Post-Covid recovery is now! “ But what can I do?” A lot of people see depressing news or watch a heartbreaking David Attenborough documentary and think this! The answer is ‘lots!’ By helping us restore a damaged forest, by ‘adopting’ a tree, you may be thousands of miles away and feeling powerless but you are directly helping change the future for the better, sowing seeds of hope and giving valuable work to our vulnerable community members. By equipping our rangers, you are fighting extinctions. It is you keeping the animals safe and your ranger warm and dry on the cold night patrols. By sponsoring a bee hive you are keeping elephants away from crops and sweetening our meals with your honey. And, of course, pollinating plants! You don’t have to buy land here to protect it. It is ours. And with your help we vow to continue to protect it! If you are a scientist, an agricultural extension worker, an IT teacher or specialist and want to come here physically, of course you are most welcome (see How to Help section). But anybody, anywhere, can help us make this new decade what the UN has called The Decade of Action! Thank you for visiting this website. We hope you enjoy your ‘virtual visit’ to our Chake home! And that you will stay with us virtually in the months to come. We will update. The doors will always be open. And feel free to share the contents! Best of all, of course, we look forward to welcoming you physically when happier times allow! Karibu! You are welcome!” Charles Kinara Founder, Chake Community Conservancy

Founder’s Message

RESPONSIBLE AGRICULTURE

The community surrounding the Chake conservancy and Masai Mara are good farmers of maize and beans, we are supporting them to protect their farm from wild animals so that they can practice sustainable farming and no more retaliations made against wild animals. Sustainable Farming

DIRECTOR

Charles Kinara

Charles Kinara founded Chake Community Conservancy and maintains a small community clinic through the Covid pandemic, spreading peace, awareness, PPE and paramedic nursing services. He loves lions and elephants. His current focus is firmly on conservation of wildlife and people. See more!

CHAIR

Samson Ondimu

Samson Ondimu handles much of the Chake Conservancy admin and paperwork. He has a diploma in education and is involved in teaching and administration at the Conservancy schools as well as in outreach projects to adults. He especially enjoys teaching farming techniques and loves sharing the pleasures of books! See why!

SECRETARY

Collins Ochumbe

Collins is Secretary for Chake and can do everything from resolving issues with a farmer who has lost crops to elephants, to helping out on a conservancy patrol to rescuing a vehicle flattened by a falling acacia tree and saving lives. He also runs Shavicol Safaris with his brother. See why he loves Cheetahs!

TREASURER

Beatrice Oyaro

Beatrice currently works in a shared ‘simple’ office as Chake Treasurer when she isn’t at home caring for her family, tending her small holding of livestock and vegetables or running her clothing and fashion shop. See why she loves lions!

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Charles Makori

Charles Makori, (39) born in the Rift Valley, with diploma in Agricultural Education and Extension specialises in teaching Chake farmers the best ways to grow crops naturally in local conditions. He says. “I love teaching the community on wildlife management and love the conflict solutions!”

COMMUNICATIONS/FUNDRAISING

Julie Rack

Julie Rack began a life long involvement with conservation and wildlife as a girl nurturing orphaned and injured lion and cheetah cubs and a varied menagerie including baboons, vervet monkeys, rooikats (caracals) before making a career of communications and fundraising. Julie has a deep love of Kenya and is a firm believer in the Conservancy model as the future for wildlife and sustainable human prosperity throughout Africa. “She says. “I want to bring this back to my home country.” See why she helps Chake!
© Chake Conservancy and licensors 2020
“A very warm welcome to the new look 2021 Chake Community Conservancy website! I am sure that wherever you live, anywhere in the world, you will agree with me that this last year has been like no other! At Chake we have watched the disaster unfurl with terrible sadness. As I write this, I see the number of Covid deaths in the USA has just topped 300,000. An unbelievable figure! Covid has cursed Kenya too, and many have died but thankfully none of our Chake community have become infected. But we miss our foreign visitors keenly! Before the pandemic nature-based tourism was the lifeblood of many economies and employed 21.8 million jobs worldwide. 1.6 million of them were in Kenya! Tourism revenue also supported many communities living next door to wildlife and conservation. This is especially true in our Conservancies. (See What is a Conservancy). Fortunately, our natural assets and our wonderful wildlife have weathered this storm and as the new year dawns we believe that we can face it with confidence. Covid-19 was not the first zoonotic pandemic to emerge in recent years. Ebola and HIV-AIDS made the jump from primates to humans in damaged tropical forests in Congo. And as a medical man I saw the dreadful impact of HIV-AIDS. It has killed over 33 million, Kenya was especially brutally affected and even now in Chake we are caring for HIV orphans although thanks to our Chake community education efforts and better healthcare the spread is curbed, Covid however has been a true wake up call to the dangers of destroying nature. The world is not fully awake but the voices are ever louder and more difficult for sleepers to ignore! The UN Sec General in his recent speech on World Biodiversity Day stated “Humanity is waging war on nature! ... Nature always strikes back and it is already doing so with growing force and fury.” His words have since been echoed by many other world leaders. And, as scientists state, we are in now as I write this, entering our planet’s Sixth Extinction. More than one million species could become extinct in the coming decades. This is not an asteroid killing dinosaurs. It is humanity waging its war. And not against an enemy. We are waging war on our best ally! Nature! But the UN leader also added “Making peace with Nature is the defining task of the 21st century. It must be the top, top priority for everyone, everywhere.” Making peace with Nature is our philosophy at Chake. We work to stop human/wildlife conflict, we teach poachers other, better ways to make a livelihood rather than Law breaking and killing, we plant trees for our community and our wild neighbours, we think the time for a new Post-Covid recovery is now! “ But what can I do?” A lot of people see depressing news or watch a heartbreaking David Attenborough documentary and think this! The answer is ‘lots!’ By helping us restore a damaged forest, by ‘adopting’ a tree, you may be thousands of miles away and feeling powerless but you are directly helping change the future for the better, sowing seeds of hope and giving valuable work to our vulnerable community members. By equipping our rangers, you are fighting extinctions. It is you keeping the animals safe and your ranger warm and dry on the cold night patrols. By sponsoring a bee hive you are keeping elephants away from crops and sweetening our meals with your honey. And, of course, pollinating plants! You don’t have to buy land here to protect it. It is ours. And with your help we vow to continue to protect it! If you are a scientist, an agricultural extension worker, an IT teacher or specialist and want to come here physically, of course you are most welcome (see How to Help section). But anybody, anywhere, can help us make this new decade what the UN has called The Decade of Action! Thank you for visiting this website. We hope you enjoy your ‘virtual visit’ to our Chake home! And that you will stay with us virtually in the months to come. We will update. The doors will always be open. And feel free to share the contents! Best of all, of course, we look forward to welcoming you physically when happier times allow! Karibu! You are welcome!” Charles Kinara Founder, Chake Community Conservancy

Founder’s Message

Welcome

Chake is a community-based conservancy in Narok county, Maasai Mara, founded in 2020 by The Chake Community Development Program (Cert. No. A3452) with the aim of conserving the environment and wildlife, solving human animal conflict and helping the community develop sustainably. It now has its own Chake Conservancy management board.

New Beginnings

Sustainable development is a journey, not a destination and the community have begun with a series of programs aimed to reduce human wildlife conflict and encourage ecological restoration of forest cover because it makes an excellent starting point. Planting trees contributes to sustainable development goals 6 Clean Water And Sanitation, 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities,13 Climate Action and 15 Life On Land.

RESPONSIBLE AGRICULTURE

The community surrounding the Chake conservancy and Masai Mara are good farmers of maize and beans, we are supporting them to protect their farm from wild animals so that they can practice sustainable farming and no more retaliations made against wild animals. Sustainable Farming
Maasai Mara For Public and Wildlife Benefit
Chake’s Office in Odonyo Orok
‘Chake’ means ‘theirs’ in the Kiswahili tongue. This name recognises that ownership of the conservancy is shared with people and wildlife. The community want to live in better harmony with nature and are opposed to the hunting and poaching of wildlife, preferring to benefit from flourishing wildlife through sustainable ecotourism and responsible farming practices. Chake (pronounced Cha-Ke) stands for: C - care for H - human and A - animals K- Kenya E - education Over the years the area had become deforested from unsustainable use as fuel. Since January 2020 members of Chake have raised over 3,500 tree seedlings in their nursery and planted them out to serve simultaneously as habitat and food for wildlife, erosion control, shade trees, windbreaks and for watershed improvement. We seek funding for these operations. Contribute To Chake Conservancy GOFUNDME

What Does Chake Mean?

CHAKE’S MANAGEMENT

The Conservancy currently has a staff of 56 and a management board as follows: Director - Charles Kinara, Chairperson - Samson Ondimu, Secretary - Collins Ochumbe, Treasurer - Beatrice Oyaro, Operations Manager - Charles Makori - Julie Rack- Communications Officer Management Page
We’re in it for the ‘triple win’! Win for the ecology Win for the community Win for the economy
Jobs
Livelihoods
Adventures
Healthy Wildlife
Quality habitat
Conservation
Sustainable Communities
Lights
Trees
Hives
Education
Wildlife Orphans
Sustainable Communities
Wildlife Widows
Chake in relation to other protected areas.
Chake Conservancy added to map courtesy of africaGeographic.

The Chake Conservancy Management Team

DIRECTOR

Charles

Kinara

Charles Kinara founded Chake Community Conservancy and maintains a small community clinic through the Covid pandemic, spreading peace, awareness, PPE and paramedic nursing services. He loves lions and elephants. His current focus is firmly on conservation of wildlife and people. See more!

CHAIR

Samson

Ondimu

Samson Ondimu handles much of the Chake Conservancy admin and paperwork. He has a diploma in education and is involved in teaching and administration at the Conservancy schools as well as in outreach projects to adults. He especially enjoys teaching farming techniques and loves sharing the pleasures of books! See why!

SECRETARY

Collins

Ochumbe

Collins is Secretary for Chake and can do everything from resolving issues with a farmer who has lost crops to elephants, to helping out on a conservancy patrol to rescuing a vehicle flattened by a falling acacia tree and saving lives. He also runs Shavicol Safaris with his brother. See why he loves Cheetahs!

TREASURER

Beatrice

Oyaro

Beatrice currently works in a shared ‘simple’ office as Chake Treasurer when she isn’t at home caring for her family, tending her small holding of livestock and vegetables or running her clothing and fashion shop. See why she loves lions!

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Charles

Makori

Charles Makori, (39) born in the Rift Valley, with diploma in Agricultural Education and Extension specialises in teaching Chake farmers the best ways to grow crops naturally in local conditions. He says. “I love teaching the community on wildlife management and love the conflict solutions!”

COMMUNICATIONS/FUNDRAISING

Julie Rack

Julie Rack began a life long involvement with conservation and wildlife as a girl nurturing orphaned and injured lion and cheetah cubs and a varied menagerie including baboons, vervet monkeys, rooikats (caracals) before making a career of communications and fundraising. Julie has a deep love of Kenya and is a firm believer in the Conservancy model as the future for wildlife and sustainable human prosperity throughout Africa. “She says. “I want to bring this back to my home country.” See why she helps Chake!
© Chake Conservancy and licensors 2020
“A very warm welcome to the new look 2021 Chake Community Conservancy website! I am sure that wherever you live, anywhere in the world, you will agree with me that this last year has been like no other! At Chake we have watched the disaster unfurl with terrible sadness. As I write this, I see the number of Covid deaths in the USA has just topped 300,000. An unbelievable figure! Covid has cursed Kenya too, and many have died but thankfully none of our Chake community have become infected. But we miss our foreign visitors keenly! Before the pandemic nature-based tourism was the lifeblood of many economies and employed 21.8 million jobs worldwide. 1.6 million of them were in Kenya! Tourism revenue also supported many communities living next door to wildlife and conservation. This is especially true in our Conservancies. (See What is a Conservancy). Fortunately, our natural assets and our wonderful wildlife have weathered this storm and as the new year dawns we believe that we can face it with confidence. Covid-19 was not the first zoonotic pandemic to emerge in recent years. Ebola and HIV-AIDS made the jump from primates to humans in damaged tropical forests in Congo. And as a medical man I saw the dreadful impact of HIV-AIDS. It has killed over 33 million, Kenya was especially brutally affected and even now in Chake we are caring for HIV orphans although thanks to our Chake community education efforts and better healthcare the spread is curbed, Covid however has been a true wake up call to the dangers of destroying nature. The world is not fully awake but the voices are ever louder and more difficult for sleepers to ignore! The UN Sec General in his recent speech on World Biodiversity Day stated “Humanity is waging war on nature! ... Nature always strikes back and it is already doing so with growing force and fury.” His words have since been echoed by many other world leaders. And, as scientists state, we are in now as I write this, entering our planet’s Sixth Extinction. More than one million species could become extinct in the coming decades. This is not an asteroid killing dinosaurs. It is humanity waging its war. And not against an enemy. We are waging war on our best ally! Nature! But the UN leader also added “Making peace with Nature is the defining task of the 21st century. It must be the top, top priority for everyone, everywhere.” Making peace with Nature is our philosophy at Chake. We work to stop human/wildlife conflict, we teach poachers other, better ways to make a livelihood rather than Law breaking and killing, we plant trees for our community and our wild neighbours, we think the time for a new Post-Covid recovery is now! “ But what can I do?” A lot of people see depressing news or watch a heartbreaking David Attenborough documentary and think this! The answer is ‘lots!’ By helping us restore a damaged forest, by ‘adopting’ a tree, you may be thousands of miles away and feeling powerless but you are directly helping change the future for the better, sowing seeds of hope and giving valuable work to our vulnerable community members. By equipping our rangers, you are fighting extinctions. It is you keeping the animals safe and your ranger warm and dry on the cold night patrols. By sponsoring a bee hive you are keeping elephants away from crops and sweetening our meals with your honey. And, of course, pollinating plants! You don’t have to buy land here to protect it. It is ours. And with your help we vow to continue to protect it! If you are a scientist, an agricultural extension worker, an IT teacher or specialist and want to come here physically, of course you are most welcome (see How to Help section). But anybody, anywhere, can help us make this new decade what the UN has called The Decade of Action! Thank you for visiting this website. We hope you enjoy your ‘virtual visit’ to our Chake home! And that you will stay with us virtually in the months to come. We will update. The doors will always be open. And feel free to share the contents! Best of all, of course, we look forward to welcoming you physically when happier times allow! Karibu! You are welcome!” Charles Kinara Founder, Chake Community Conservancy

Founder’s Message

Welcome

Chake is a community-based conservancy in Narok county, Maasai Mara, founded in 2020 by The Chake Community Development Program (Cert. No. A3452) with the aim of conserving the environment and wildlife, solving human animal conflict and helping the community develop sustainably. It now has its own Chake Conservancy management board.

New Beginnings

Sustainable development is a journey, not a destination and the community have begun with a series of programs aimed to reduce human wildlife conflict and encourage ecological restoration of forest cover because it makes an excellent starting point. Planting trees contributes to sustainable development goals 6 Clean Water And Sanitation, 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities,13 Climate Action and 15 Life On Land.

CHAKE’S MANAGEMENT

The Conservancy currently has a staff of 56 and a management board as follows: Director - Charles Kinara, Chairperson - Samson Ondimu, Secretary - Collins Ochumbe, Treasurer - Beatrice Oyaro, Operations Manager - Charles Makori - Julie Rack- Communications Officer Management Page
We’re in it for the ‘triple win’! Win for the ecology Win for the community Win for the economy
Chake’s Office in Odonyo Orok

RESPONSIBLE AGRICULTURE

The community surrounding the Chake conservancy and Masai Mara are good farmers of maize and beans, we are supporting them to protect their farm from wild animals so that they can practice sustainable farming and no more retaliations made against wild animals. Sustainable Farming
Lights
Trees
Sustainable Communities
Jobs
Livelihoods
Adventures
Sustainable Communities
Healthy Wildlife
Quality habitat
Conservation
‘Chake’ means ‘theirs’ in the Kiswahili tongue. This name recognises that ownership of the conservancy is shared with people and wildlife. The community want to live in better harmony with nature and are opposed to the hunting and poaching of wildlife, preferring to benefit from flourishing wildlife through sustainable ecotourism and responsible farming practices. Chake (pronounced Cha-Ke) stands for: C - care for H - human and A - animals K- Kenya E - education Over the years the area had become deforested from unsustainable use as fuel. Since January 2020 members of Chake have raised over 3,500 tree seedlings in their nursery and planted them out to serve simultaneously as habitat and food for wildlife, erosion control, shade trees, windbreaks and for watershed improvement. We seek funding for these operations. Contribute To Chake Conservancy GOFUNDME

What Does Chake Mean?

Chake in relation to other protected areas.
Chake Conservancy added to map courtesy of africaGeographic.

The Chake Conservancy Management Team

DIRECTOR

Charles

Kinara

Charles Kinara founded Chake Community Conservancy and maintains a small community clinic through the Covid pandemic, spreading peace, awareness, PPE and paramedic nursing services. He loves lions and elephants. His current focus is firmly on conservation of wildlife and people. See more!

CHAIR

Samson

Ondimu

Samson Ondimu handles much of the Chake Conservancy admin and paperwork. He has a diploma in education and is involved in teaching and administration at the Conservancy schools as well as in outreach projects to adults. He especially enjoys teaching farming techniques and loves sharing the pleasures of books! See why!

SECRETARY

Collins

Ochumbe

Collins is Secretary for Chake and can do everything from resolving issues with a farmer who has lost crops to elephants, to helping out on a conservancy patrol to rescuing a vehicle flattened by a falling acacia tree and saving lives. He also runs Shavicol Safaris with his brother. See why he loves Cheetahs!

TREASURER

Beatrice

Oyaro

Beatrice currently works in a shared ‘simple’ office as Chake Treasurer when she isn’t at home caring for her family, tending her small holding of livestock and vegetables or running her clothing and fashion shop. See why she loves lions!

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Charles

Makori

Charles Makori, (39) born in the Rift Valley, with diploma in Agricultural Education and Extension specialises in teaching Chake farmers the best ways to grow crops naturally in local conditions. He says. “I love teaching the community on wildlife management and love the conflict solutions!”

COMMUNICATIONS/FUNDRAISING

Julie Rack

Julie Rack began a life long involvement with conservation and wildlife as a girl nurturing orphaned and injured lion and cheetah cubs and a varied menagerie including baboons, vervet monkeys, rooikats (caracals) before making a career of communications and fundraising. Julie has a deep love of Kenya and is a firm believer in the Conservancy model as the future for wildlife and sustainable human prosperity throughout Africa. “She says. “I want to bring this back to my home country.” See why she helps Chake!